For the most part, Easter was celebrated quite differently in the 50's than it is today.  Easter Sunday was considered a revered time.  During the 1950's, more than 90% of people living in the US identified themselves as Christians.    On Easter Sunday, most churches were overflowing with members and visitors.  For some churches Easter Sunday was their most highly attended service of the year.

 

Department store windows were decorated with mannequins wearing beautiful Easter outfits.  On Easter Sunday, ladies were dressed in pretty suits or dresses, hats, and many wore white gloves.  It was not unusual for them to be sporting corsages.  Men were always dressed in suits, ties, dress shoes and hats.  Young boys were either dressed in suits, dress shoes and ties, or dress pants and ties with dress shoes.  Young girls wore ruffled dresses and often Easter bonnets and white gloves.

   
Dyeing Easter eggs was a family tradition all children looked forward to every year.

   
Some families chose to give their children Easter baskets and have Easter egg hunts in their yards before they went to church.  In other families, church was always first followed by Easter festivities after church.

 

Most families had the traditional Easter ham dinner.   Restaurants were not open on Easter Sunday.  

 

Other families chose to celebrate the day with friends and relatives with a neighborhood picnic.  Often times, families met at local parks to enjoy a picnic together.

   
One honored tradition was revived in 1953 when the White House Easter Egg Roll was held for the first time in over 10 years.  Since then it has become an honored tradition.  

 

The 1950's brought with it Easter Sundays that were focused on the religious meaning of Easter.  Families went to church decked out in their best finery.  Homes were filled with relatives awaiting the traditional Easter dinner, a picnic or egg hunt.  Easter was truly a big deal in that era!
 

 

Easter Ads in the 50's

 

Page created 11/18/19